Friday, August 30, 2013

THE WHATNOT Giveaways! (US / Europe + Canada)


I got another box of ARCsssss. And since The Whatnot is out in less than thirty days and I will have shiny hardcovers and the glitchy advance copies will suddenly be gross and loathesome, I will give them to YOU. :)


That intro didn't make this sound like an appealing giveaway at all, BUT IT IS I promise.

Here's the fancy blurb Harper made. If you're just popping in, The Whatnot is steampunk + creepy faeries + creepy Victorians + changeling children going on adventures + magic, and also the companion book to my first book The Peculiar.


ALSO - because the Raffelcopter giveaway is for US only, if you live in Europe or Canada or whatever other countries are listed, you can enter the Goodreads giveaway Harper is doing. They will be giving away 20 finished copies here.

And if you do live in the US just enter below. You get one free entry because you're cool, and then if you follow my silliness on twitter or tweet the giveaway or follow this blog you get a bunch of other entries. TWO winners will each win:

1 personalized + signed advance reader copy of The Whatnot, the companion to The Peculiar.

And chocolate, if I have some.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Saturday, August 24, 2013

VERSAILLES!



Ok, Stefan goes to Versailles. It was so great. And inspiring. And all that good stuff. Basically everyone in my family had been before, and I had not, and I felt it would be helpful when writing about underground Versailles to know something about overground Versailles, so we took a day of the Paris trip and WENT.

(Photo credit is all my mom's, thank you Mommmm!)

The train to Versailles.

I clearly make the most dashing Frenchman. I mean look at those snazzy stockings.

This girl was like "Dude, how long IS the line," and Dude was like, "Girl, it goes back, and forth, and back, and forth. TEN TIMES. Hehehe."
And it did:
Back.

And Forth.

Ten times.

There were a lot of people. But we got in eventually, and I was reading a marvelous book while shuffling along, so it didn't seem bad at all.

Roofs should have gold on them, too, so that people don't mistake you for being poor or tasteful.
Versailles from the top. It has something like 2,000 rooms and used to house 14,000 people, so it was basically an entire city under one roof. Which is such an interesting concept, I find.

This was a stripped room in the entrance wing. So, this is how the rooms would look minus the paint and gilt and millions of dollars worth of furniture.
And this is how they actually look.

THIS. It has a glare, but it's a model cross-section of the opera auditorium in the palace, and I thought it was fascinating.

So many peopllllle. This is the hall of mirrors. My hall of mirrors in the book had to look compeltely different because drastic things need to happen in it, but it was cool to see.
Then we got tons of pictures of doors, because doors are important. xD

Also locks.
And window handles.
And ceilings.

And chandeliers.

And beds.

And more locks.

And then we went out into the sunshine.

The gardensssss. They're vast.
And have carefully squared-off trees.

And then we were done.
And THEN. Versailles is the name of a town where the palace was built. It's a very pretty one that seemed quintessentially French, at least to me.

We found a roadside cafe Mom had been to before and had crepes.

And more crepes for dessert. Mine looks sad and plain in comparison with the mountains of cream on the other one, but it was salted toffee and vanilla ice cream, and it was SO GOOD.
And that was all! We went back to Paris. A few days later we went home. And it was grand.


Friday, August 16, 2013

PARIS!



Paris bloooog. This will be all pictures. And I'll post more pictures soon. And then I can pretend I'm a super disciplined blogger who puts up content regularly and never forgets to post three weeks in a row EVER. :D

When going to Paris one must pack all the colored socks, I feel.

4 hours of train-riding later we're therrre. The lady sitting across from us was telling someone how it used to be a 9-hour train-ride from Zürich to Paris. We dropped off our stuff at the hotel and here is me toddling off to see the city.

Pretty Paris.
Pretty.

Pretty.
Pretty tiny.


Pretty huge.
Pretty.

Pretty-pretty-pretty.
Two-story carousel in the middle of the city that struck me as cool and steampunk-ish.


A house boat on the Seine.

The Pistacherie down the road from our hotel. It literally just sells nuts in all their many varieties.
That evening we went and got food and were screamed at by an angry Frenchwoman while crossing the street. I don't know why. Perhaps because of reasons, but perhaps not.

These were for sale in the English foods section of one of the shops. Isn't it definitely the most appetizing and appealing way to market processed peas? It is.

AHHH, DO YOU SEE? DO YOU SEE WHOSE BOOK IS FACE-OUT IN A PARIS BOOKSTORE? It was an English bookstore, but still, made me happy.

We found a little candy shop.

We bought things there. Here are the fruit jellies. They were not fantastic to be honest, and neither were the caramels, and it's always sad to eat not-fantastic candy because if you're going to eat junk the junk should really taste amazing.

The ARCH OF TRIUMPH.











The Arch of a Slightly Less-Auspicious Triumph.

French café food. So good. And fast. It only takes about five or ten minutes to be served at most places, even in tourist areas and during lunch hours which is crazyyyy.
Angry cat at the Louis Vuitton shop, there to encourage people to buy handbags.

Mom was enamored with this guy's spiky shoes. She took many surreptitious pictures of them.
Breakfast. The less-healthy looking plate is mine.

The Pont des Arts bridge. See the railing?
It's covered with these locks. The locks are for when you're madly and desperately in love. You buy a padlock and lock it onto the bridge and throw the key into the Seine and then you and your significant other will stay together forever and ever unless you don't in which case oh well, the lock stays on the bridge in Paris and it's suddenly very tragic.
STATUE.
Statue was erected by the school children of America maybe instead of math class.


Ok, that was long. And Part II is still coming. It will be about a design museum in Paris and visiting Versailles and taking pictures of the door-locks there because THEY ARE IMPORTANT FOR BOOKS, really. We didn't go into Notre Dame, or the Louvre, or the catacombs, mostly because it's summer and the lines are ridiculous. But it was a ton of fun. And Versailles was awesome.

Bye! :)